Announcing the results of the Spring 2024 Migratory Bird Count

We are excited to share the official tally of bird species encountered during our annual bird count, along with the “running count” that includes birds observed over the past two days. This springs birding event was remarkable, marking our most impressive count yet, with a grand total of 68 species recorded during the count. Adding the additional 8 species spotted in the running count, we reached an impressive total of 76 species! (See list of bird species below.)

Despite the chill, which might have deterred the raptors, we enjoyed a dry day with intermittent sunshine—a beautiful setting for our bird count. It’s no surprise that our most significant sightings occurred in areas rich with native flora. One highlight was the spotting of the Blue Winged Warbler. Remarkably, we hadn’t encountered one since our first watch over a decade ago, and yesterday, we were fortunate to observe three. Truly wonderful!

Bird counts play a pivotal role in understanding and preserving the rich biodiversity of our island. By documenting avian species year after year, we gain invaluable insights into the health of our island’s ecosystems, informing conservation efforts and ensuring a sustainable future for both our feathered friends and our community.

Here’s the list of species we encountered in our Spring 2024 Migratory Bird Count.

Thank you to all who participated.

Spring 2024 Bird Count
American crow
American goldfinch
American redstart
American robin
Baltimore oriole
Barn swallow
Black-capped chickadee
Brown-headed cowbird
Brown thrasher
Black-throated green warbler
Black-and-white warbler
Blackburnian warbler*
Blue-gray gnatcatcher*
Blue jay
Blue-winged warbler
Canada goose
Carolina wren
Chipping sparrow
Chimney swift
Common eider
Common grackle
Common loon*
Common yellowthroat
Chestnut-sided warbler
Double-crested cormorant
Downy woodpecker
Eastern kingbird
Eastern towhee
European starling
Fish crow*
Greater black-backed gull
Great blue heron
Great-crested flycatcher
Gray catbird
Great egret
Greater yellowlegs
Herring gull
House finch
Hooded merganser
House sparrow
House wren
Killdeer
Laughing gull*
Least tern
Mallard
Magnolia warbler
Mourning dove
Northern bobwhite
Northern cardinal
Northern flicker
Northern mockingbird
Northern parula
Orchard oriole
Yellow warbler
Osprey
Ovenbird
Pine warbler
Red-bellied woodpecker
Red-winged blackbird
Red-eyed vireo
Ring-necked pheasant
Ruby-crowned kinglet
Ruby-throated hummingbird*
Ruddy turnstone
Saltmarsh sparrow*
Song sparrow
Swainson's thrush*
Tree swallow
Tufted titmouse
Veery
White-eyed vireo
Woodthrush
White-throated sparrow
Yellow warbler
Yellow-bellied sapsucker
Yellow-rumped warbler*

Announcing the results of the Fall 2023 Migratory Bird Count

We are excited to share the official tally of bird species encountered during our annual bird count, along with the “running count” that includes birds observed over the past two days. This fall’s birding event was remarkable, with a grand total of 50 species recorded during the count. Adding the additional 7 species spotted in the running count, we reached an impressive total of 57 species! (See list of bird species below.)

This year brought us some extraordinary birding moments, which we attribute to the recent major storms that grounded much of the bird activity in the days leading up to the count.

With a decade now behind us, we’ve successfully completed our 10th year of the migratory bird count. The data collected during these ten years will serve as a valuable resource for analyzing trends in bird activity on our island.

Here’s the list of species we encountered in our Fall 2023 Migratory Bird Count.

Thank you to all who participated.

Fall 2023 Bird Count
American crow
American goldfinch
American kestrel
American redstart
American robin
Belted kingfisher (running)
Black-capped chickadee
Blue jay
Brown thrasher
Black & white warbler
Bobolink (running and confirmed; congrats Tom!)
Carolina wren
Cedar waxwing
Chimney swift
Chipping sparrow (running)
Common eider
Common grackle
Common loon (running)
Common yellowthroat
Cooper's hawk
Double crested cormorant
Downy woodpecker
Eastern phoebe
Eastern towhee
European starling
Greater black-backed gull
Great blue heron
Golden-crowned kinglet
Gray catbird
Great egret
Herring gull
House finch
House sparrow
Laughing gull (running)
Mallard
Merlin
Mourning dove
Mute swan
Northern cardinal
Northern flicker
Northern harrier
Northern mockingbird
Red-bellied woodpecker
Red-tailed hawk
Northern rough-winged swallow
Osprey (running)
Savannah sparrow
Salt marsh sparrow
Swamp sparrow (running)
Song sparrow
Tufted titmouse
White-breasted nuthatch
White-throated sparrow
Yellow-billed cuckoo
Yellow warbler
Yellow-rumped warbler

Bird watchers scan the skies looking for birds to include in the biannual migratory bird count on Fishers Island.

Join us for our 2023 Fall Migratory Bird Count alongside our University of Delaware experts, Emily Baisden and Will Almeida. 

Event Details: 

What: FIConservancy 2023 Fall Migratory Bird Count

When: Sunday, October 1, 2023 @ 8:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Where: Meet at Fishers Island Community Center

Make sure to bring your binoculars!

Following Audubon bird count rules, birders will make 15 five-minute stops from West End to East End. At each timed stop, birders count birds and call out what they see.

The outcomes from these bird counts play a crucial role in assisting scientists and conservation groups in mapping bird populations. Furthermore, they provide valuable insights into the distribution and frequency of various bird species within our local environment.

Plastic in the water, on the land and IN you! Fighting pollution on Fishers Island and Beyond

Event Details: 

Date: October 8th

Time: 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM 

Place: In-person at the Museum, 2nd Floor and virtual via Zoom

Category: Illustrated Talk

 

Plastic pollution is a bad neighbor. As plastic breaks up into microplastics it disperses into the environment. Researchers are finding plastic particles almost everywhere they look, including inside the human body.

What are the impacts of these plastics, and what can we do to stop them?  

Join Dr. Megan J. Wolff, MPH, policy director at Beyond Plastics, as she talks about what individuals can do to reduce their consumption and exposure to plastics as well as discuss the exciting legislative initiatives underway in the state of New York aimed at significantly reducing plastic  pollution.

Michele Klimczak, our Coastal Debris Coordinator at the Fishers Island Conservancy, will also be presenting an overview of the extensive repercussions of plastic pollution on the island, offering a localized perspective to complement the presentation by Dr. Megan J. Wolff.

*To secure your spot, please reach out to us at 631-788-7239 or send an email to fimuseum@fishersisland.net. Virtual attendance does not require prior registration.